Posts Tagged ‘Diaspar’

Journey to Sirius with Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

February 18, 2014
Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

Acclaimed Space Musician Vic Hennegan Play Live on Echoes

You can sort of blame me for Vic Hennegan.  He grew up in Philadephia in the 1970s listening to me spinning space music albums by Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream and Jean Michel Jarre on WXPN back then.  That, and the fact that his mother took him to psychedelic ballrooms like the Electric Factory as a child permanently mutated Vic Hennegan’s musical DNA. Now he makes his own electronic music that emulates that sound and brings in something new.  He recently put out a download release called Journey to Sirius.   He comes into the Echoes Living Room to play music from it live.  You can also hear a long track from his set, an unreleased piece, on our album TRANSMISSIONS: THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19 (See below)

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

TimelinesCDcoverJoin the Echoes CD of the Month Club.  Erik Wøllo’s Timelines is our February CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

LRC19-250pxGIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Last Spaceship Before Christmas: Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

December 23, 2013
Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

Vic Hennegan Live on Echoes

You can sort of blame me for Vic Hennegan.  He grew up in Philadephia in the 1970s listening to me spinning space music albums by Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream and Jean Michel Jarre on WXPN back then.  That, and the fact that his mother took him to psychedelic ballrooms like the Electric Factory as a child permanently mutated Vic Hennegan’s musical DNA. Now he makes his own electronic music that emulates that sound and brings in something new.  He recently put out a download release called Journey to Sirius.   He comes into the Echoes Living Room to play music from it live.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

FoundJoin the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

OR

LRC19-250px

GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Parasites of the Western World.

August 21, 2010

Post-Punk-Psychedelic Space from 1978

My wife, Kimberly Haas,  sent me a text message from a record store in New York City.

“We stopped in a used vinyl store.  What LP would earn this description?  “Fucked up longhaired love child of Chrome and Cluster from 1978.”   Hint: An obscure LP we used to play one track from on Diaspar”

It took me one second to text back: Parasites of the Western World.  The Cluster reference was misleading.  It should’ve been Neu!. And we actually played several tracks on Diaspar, a progressive rock show on WXPN from 1974-1989.  But that description instantly called to mind the 1978 album from a duo out of Portland, Oregon.  In those days when DIY was really DIY, the cover was just the bands name, with white on black lettering and the back cover featured two overly serious long-haired musicians slinging twin Gibson SGs and wearing very thick ski gloves that would not be conducive to playing the guitar.

Parasites of the Western World were mostly Patrick Burke and Terry Censky and they created a slab of post-psychedelic punk full of distorted guitars, squigly synths and metronome drumming, at least  when they weren’t playing dirges like “Funeral for a Mouse” and “God or Just a Slow Breeze.”  The Chrome reference is a good one for that Sex Pistols meets LSD  sound full of snarling feedback guitars and ominous vocals,and they wave their psychedelic flag with a cover of The Beatles’ “Flying,” but a more apt point of reference was the space-metal of Hawkwind.    Songs like “Mo” and and the multi-part “Accessories,” each with crushing grooves and wailing, blues-drenched acid guitar were at once dated and prescient in 1978.

The hit of the album, especially on Diaspar, was “You Must Be Joe King” a tab of doomy punk pop, with a persistant ostinato bassline and a  killer chorus that would’ve fit on  Radiohead’s OK Computer.  And then there are verses like:

I take my cats and dogs to doctors

They give them shots and feed them pills

They take me out for runs and walks

It’s up to them to pay the bills.

This album has never come out on CD, although you can buy a CDr and it’s on iTunes.  They released one more album, Substrata, a much more conventional rock affair and Burke apparently has some solo releases that I haven’t heard.  But if you want to slip one over on your arty alt-rock friends, slide this album onto the turntable, preferably on vintage vinyl from Criminal Records.  It was rough and ready, but listening back after 32 years, I’d still play it on the air.

John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

The Residents: Address Unknown

February 6, 2010

The Residents Play Philadelphia and More
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The Residents are coming on what is reputedly only their 7th world tour in 40 years.  This anarchic, satirical, experimental ensemble has been creating mind-snapping albums since the early 70s, often making twisted parodies of rock iconography.  Their first album was Meet The Residents, a take-off on Meet the Beatles.   A later album, Third Reich and Roll featured a caricature of a smiling Dick Clark in a Nazi SS uniform with tiny Hitlers dancing  ala American BandstandThe Residents have created some brilliant electronic soundscapes like Eskimo, released on white vinyl (and nominated for a Grammy in 1979 by what must have been a very stoned Academy) and their Fingerprince electrified the “Ketjak” or “Ramayana Monkey Chant” of Bali.  It was during this period that The Residents were in heavy rotation on WXPN‘s Diaspar show.
Their music became increasingly conceptual and theatrical over the years with the band adopting stage guises including the famous Eyeball Heads and Tuxedo look.   I’d lost track of The Residents in the new millennium.  I think I just got exhausted by their prolific output.   They’ve churned out 18 CDs in the 2000s, including four last year alone.
I’ve never seen The Residents live and I don’t believe they’ve ever played Philadelphia.  But these cryptic musicians, who have kept their identities secret these many years, are currently on their Talking Light tour, hitting all the usual metropolitan areas including Philadelphia on Monday, February 8 at World Café Live.  Reportedly, they’ll be playing a career retrospective.  It’s a rare event and sure to be one of those concerts you’ll be talking about later, one way or another.  As their mock Coca-Cola logo states, “It’s the Surreal Thing.”

There’s a lot of Residents videos on YouTube since they were pioneers of the form.  Here’s a nice performance video from a few years ago  that’s something of a history and commentary on The Residents.

John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

It’s Progressive Rock All Over Again

January 3, 2009

Gentle GiantThis weekend I’ll be guesting on Highs in the 70s: Progressive Rock on WXPN in Philadelphia It’s among a series of irregularly scheduled retro shows they run.  It’s going to be an 8-hour marathon, from 10AM til 6PM on Saturday, January 3. I’ll be in for the first half, Chuck Van Zyl from Star’s End will be on in the second half and the whole thing is being run by WXPN’s Dan Reed and his cohort, Biff Kennedy.

These progressive rock retroscursions are always an interesting exercise for me. I was a progressive rock zealot in the 1970s and that music informs much of what I listen to today and play on Echoes. It keeps coming up in unusual situations with musicians you might never suspect citing progressive rock acts from the 1970s as influences. Ulrich Schnauss can name Tangerine Dream tracks just from the opening applause. Toby Marks of Banco De Gaia lifts mellotron samples inspired by Genesis.  Steve Roach had a poster of Yes‘s Tales from Topographic Oceans in his studio.   The Album Leaf references Neu!, The Dandy Warhols pay homage to Can and everyone bows at the altar of Pink Floyd.

Selling England by the Pound It’s been about 30 years since I last spun Progressive Rock on WXPN’s Diaspar show and I don’t go back and listen to a lot of this music now. Certain artists, like Steve Tibbetts, Peter Gabriel and Brian Eno remain in my music life, while others like Genesis, Nektar, and Tangerine Dream have diminished in relevance.  I still enjoy it when I hear it. I just don’t feel compelled to hear it. Rubycon

But I’ll be inundated with it for a few hours this Saturday. Outside of the odd fundraising retro-special on PBS, this may be the widest exposure that Progressive rock has had in the US in about 25 years.  At least, I’m not aware of any major market radio station with an audience of over 300,000 dedicating a lot of time to progressive rock.  I don’t know what music I’ll actually get to, but I’ll have a bag with recordings from Hawkwind, Mike Oldfield, Vangelis, Steve Hillage, Can and many more.

So if you want to take a trip to the fantasyland of prog, tune in to WXPN at 88.5 FM or on-line at http://xpn.org

John Diliberto  (((echoes)))


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