Posts Tagged ‘String Quartet’

Jherek Bischoff on Echoes Podcast

December 22, 2013
Jherek Bischoff & Ukelele

Jherek Bischoff & Ukelele

Hear about Jherek Bishoff’s strange life and idiosyncratic music in the Echoes Podcast.

There’s a lot of chamber music being written lately by rock musicians.  Ólafur Arnalds, Johann Johannsson, Rhian Sheehan all started out as pure rock musicians, often punk musicians.  So did Jherek Bischoff.  He’s played with people like Amanda Palmer, but on his own he makes a chamber pop music that includes vocalists like David Byrne, and pure contemporary chamber music that sounds more like Arvo Part.  coverHe has two albums out, Composed and Scores: Composed Instrumentals, and he makes a lot of his music with a ukulele.  At the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit in Asheville, North Carolina this fall, I talked with Jherek Bischoff about his retro sound.

Jherek is moving into new directions in his music and some of it is up on youtube.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

Join the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

ORLRC19-250px

GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Jherek Bischoff’s Chamber Pop & Deep Listening.

December 18, 2013
Jherek Bischoff & Ukelele

Jherek Bischoff & Ukelele

There’s a lot of chamber music being written lately by rock musicians.  Ólafur Arnalds, Johann Johannsson, Rhian Sheehan all started out as pure rock musicians, often punk musicians.  So did Jherek Bischoff.  He’s played with people like Amanda Palmer, but on his own he makes a chamber pop music that includes vocalists like David Byrne, and pure contemporary chamber music that sounds more like Arvo Part.  coverHe has two albums out, Composed and Scores: Composed Instrumentals, and he makes a lot of his music with a ukulele.  At the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit in Asheville, North Carolina this fall, I talked with Jherek Bischoff about his retro sound.

Jherek is moving into new directions in his music and some of it is up on youtube.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

Join the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

ORLRC19-250px

GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Heavy Metal Strings-Eklipse Live on Echoes

December 12, 2013

Eklipse, A Non-Classical String Quartet Plays Live on Echoes Tonight.

Eklipse in Dominatrix mode

Eklipse in Dominatrix mode

Eklipse Set List for North American Tour

Eklipse Set List for North American Tour

Eklipse’s live performance on Echoes has been one of our most popular shows of 2013.  If you like your string quartets wearing dominatrix attire, glam make-up and playing songs from pop and alt-rock bands, then I’ve got one for you.  Their name is Eklipse, and they are a quartet of young German women flaunting their sexuality and their love of modern pop music. They’ve gained a following in heavy metal circles, but their sound is more classical than metal as they turn alt-rock songs from people like Justin Timberlake, Nick Cave and Massive Attack into classical etudes on their album, Electric Air.  You can’t see them on the radio, but you can hear them live tonight on Echoes.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

FoundJoin the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

ORLRC19-250px

GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

The Reinvention of Kaki King – Echoes Podcast

December 14, 2012

Hear the Podcast of Kaki King’s Echoes Interview

Kaki King in Echoes BLack Box

Kaki King in Echoes BLack Box

There’s little doubt that Kaki King has been the most high profile acoustic guitar player of the last decade.  Since her 2003 debut she’s recorded several albums, collaborated with musicians like The Goo Goo Dolls, scored films like Into the Wild with Eddie Vedder and Michael Brook and generally left most musicians gasping for breath in her wake.  She recently released her album Glow, and it’s yet another new direction for the peripatetic guitarist.

Kaki King has been in a buoyant mood lately.  The beyond petite guitarist smiles gently with her boyish brown haircut, holding her Ovation guitar. She’s had one of those life changes that seem pretty good.

“Yeah, I got married,” she reveals. “I met her after same sex marriage was legal in New York State.  And it changed a lot of things for me.  It  changed what I was looking for and what I thought was possible for me as far as stability and making, and protecting a family, and a lot of things.  And I didn’t know that would happen.  And it’s the best thing I’ve ever done.”

617-AkrLI0L._SL500_AA300_You might be able to hear that change on Kaki King’s Glow.

“I was engaged when I made Glow and I didn’t know what stability would do for me because I was thriving on chaos for years and years,” she says.  “And I wrote a lot of songs.  And I didn’t know what would happen and it turns out that I’m doing even better work.”

Kaki King has come a long way since she was playing in New York City Subways.

“I miss playing in the subways,” she says wistfully.  “It’s been too long, about five years.”

Since her 2003 solo debut, Everybody Loves You, she’s rejected the roll of solo fingerstyle guitarist.  She played with her sound, adding vocals here, different musicians there.  Her experiments culminated in her 2010 album, Junior, made with a full rock band and often raging distortion.

“Sure I mean they’ve all been kind of sharp changes in direction,” she says.  “This record for me was partially about reconnecting with being a solo acoustic player and again, trying to push the envelope and see what was possible.”

There was a point where Kaki King was contemplating divorce.  Not from her new spouse, but from her guitar.

“It’s like being with a partner, I mean, for 29 years at this point,” she confesses.  “I played guitar and I was just evaluating my marriage to it.  I didn’t want to play.  That’s the truth; I just didn’t want to pick it up.  I just didn’t have that feeling anymore.  And I had to reestablish my relationship with it.

“How did you do that?” I asked.

“I played,” she quickly responds.  “I forced myself.  I went on tour with a bunch of weird guitarists.  We did this “Guitar Freak Show”, so I created an environment in which if I wanted to, if we wanted to reconcile we could.  And it worked and I do love playing guitar.  I love it.”

Hear more of Kaki King’s interview including talking about her koto guitar and playing with the string quartet, Ethel, in the Echoes Podcast.

~© 2012 John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

Echoes On LineGet ECHOES ON-LINE for 37% OFF until Christmas.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line.  Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.  And now, for a limited time, access is 37% the normal price.

Sign up for Echoes CD of the Month Club.

With the Echoes CD of the Month Club, you get great CDs like Hammock’s Departure Songs coming to you each month.  Follow the link to the Echoes CD of the Month Club  and see what you’ve been missing.

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album.

Kronos Quartet-Always Electric

January 6, 2010

Kronos Quartet Began plugged in and they’re still attuned to the wired world.

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You can hear an Audio Version of thius Blog with music from Kronos.

David Harrington of Kronos

In 1980 the Kronos Quartet did something string quartets don’t do.  They played Jimi Hendrix‘s “Purple Haze.”  Some 30 years later, they’re still doing things that string quartets don’t do, like playing the music of Iceland’s Sigur Ros.

You might think that playing Sigur Ros has a connection to Hendrix, but actually, the connection goes back to the origins of the group in 1973.  That’s when kronos founder David Harrington heard George Crumb‘s composition, “Black Angels for Electric String Quartet.”

David Harrington: someone was asking me whether the string quartet was dead before 1973.  And, that’s when I started Kronos.  And I said, “No, it was not dead.”  It had been reborn in 1970 when George Crumb wrote “Black Angels.”  It was dying before that.  But all of a sudden, there was this visionary piece that felt right to play, for an American musician to play, in the context of the Vietnam War.  In the context of growing up in our society.  And, it’s a piece that brought so many sounds into the realm of string quartet music.

Kronos Quartet’s search for the new hasn’t changed. On their 2009 album, Floodplain, Harrington discovered artists like the Ramallah Underground who you won’t find in the classical musicians directory.

David Harrington: Ramallah Underground from Palestine.  I heard them on MySpace and I just thought, “This is amazing.  and I found out they live in three different places.  And they compose their music on the Internet.

The world is a musical cornucopia for a group that doesn’t see fences and who embrace everything from Bela Bartok and Steve Reich to Hamza El Din and Nine Inch Nails.

David Harrington:  After a point you get, you do get used to people saying, “Well, a string quartet can’t do that,”  or, “You shouldn’t sound like this,” or “It’s not really part of X or Y tradition.” I just encounter that all the time and so I, you know, either you get a callous or you just forget about it.  [laughs]

Kronos Quartet’s latest album is Floodplain on Nonesuch Records. They’ll be touring the US extensively in 2010 including a four night stand in March at Carnegie Hall where they will premiere a new work by Terry Riley.  We’ll have a more extensive interview with David Harrington on Monday’s Echoes 01/11/10.  This has been an Echo Location, Soundings for New Music.

John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

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