Posts Tagged ‘Metheny’

2013 Rewind: Best of Echoes 2013 Listener Poll

January 1, 2014

TimeLapseStart 2014 Off Right with a Reprise Broadcast of The Best of Echoes 2013 Listener Poll Results tonight 01/01/2014

What do you get when you take a contemporary avant-garde composer, psychedelic folkies, Indian sitarists and Japanese electronic musicians.  Apparently you get the soundscape of Echoes or at least the music listeners thought was the best aspect of that soundscape.  Listeners have voted and today we’ll hear the results of the Best of Echoes 2013.

A few comments:
Both listeners and Echoes staff picked the same number one album, Ludovico Einaudi’s In A Time Lapse, the listeners by a very wide margin.

Innocents-250Nine tracks from 25 Essential Echoes CDs for 2013 made it to the listener poll.

Five CD of the Month Picks made it to the Listener Poll (Nine made it to 25 Essential Echoes CDs)

Dead-Can-Dance-In-ConcertIt’s the 2013 Poll, but there is music on it dating back from one to forty  years: Dead Can Dance’s In Concert, essentially there 2012 #1 album, Anastasis done live, Steve Roach’s Rasa Dance, a collection with tracks dating back to the 1980s, and daftpunk-1367945965Tubular Beats, a remix of Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells.

And who would’ve thought that a band who had a #2 hit single, would be on an Echoes list? We didn’t play Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” but the album it came from Random Access Memories, came in at #9.  Top Ten on Echoes has to be better than #2 on Billboard, right?


BEST OF ECHOES 2013 LISTENER POLL

  1. Ludovico Einaudi In a Time Lapse (Ponderosa Music & Art) iTunes
  2. MobyInnocents (Mute) iTunes
  3. Dead Can DanceIn Concert (PIAS America)
  4. Sigur RosKveikur (XL Recordings) Kveikur - Sigur RÛs
  5. Ulrich SchnaussA Long Way to Fall (Domino Records)
  6. Agnes ObelAventine (Pias America)
  7. David BowieThe Next Day  (Columbia)
  8. Ólafur ArnaldsFor Now I Am Winter (Mercury Classics) iTunes
  9. Daft PunkRandom Access Memory (Columbia)
  10. Bombay Dub OrchestraTales from the Grand Bazaar (Six Degrees) iTunes
  11. David Helpling & Jon JenkinsFound (Spotted Peccary) iTunes
  12. Darshan AmbientLittle Things (Spotted Peccary) iTunes
  13. Anoushka ShankarTraces of You (Deutsche Grammophon) iTunes
  14. Steve Roach Rasa Dance: The Music of Connection (Projekt)
  15. ArboreaFortress of the Sun (ESP Disk Ltd.)
  16. Kitaro Final Call (Domo Records)
  17. Boards of CanadaTomorrow’s Harvest (Warp Records)
  18. Mike OldfieldTubular Beats (Eagle Rock Entertainment)
  19. R. Carlos Nakai & Will ClipmanAwakening the Fire (Canyon Records)
  20. Tom Griesgraber & Bert LamsUnnamed Lands (Inner Knot) iTunes
  21. Mazzy StarSeasons of Your Day (Ingrooves)
  22. The Civil WarsThe Civil Wars (Sensibility Recordings) iTunes
  23. Pat MethenyThe Orchestrion Project (Nonesuch) iTunes
  24. Bill FrisellBig Sur (Sony Masterworks)
  25. Pat MethenyTap: John Zorns’s Book of Angels, Vol. 20 (Nonesuch)

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

FoundNine of the CDs in this list were Echoes CDs of the Month, and the other three could’ve been on this list. Join the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

ORLRC19-250px


GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Best of Echoes 2013 Listener Poll

December 17, 2013

TimeLapseWhat do you get when you take a contemporary avant-garde composer, psychedelic folkies, Indian sitarists and Japanese electronic musicians.  Apparently you get the soundscape of Echoes or at least the music listeners thought was the best aspect of that soundscape.  Listeners have voted and today we’ll hear the results of the Best of Echoes 2013.

A few comments:
Both listeners and Echoes staff picked the same number one album, Ludovico Einaudi’s In A Time Lapse, the listeners by a very wide margin.

Innocents-250Nine tracks from 25 Essential Echoes CDs for 2013 made it to the listener poll.

Five CD of the Month Picks made it to the Listener Poll (Nine made it to 25 Essential Echoes CDs)

Dead-Can-Dance-In-ConcertIt’s the 2013 Poll, but there is music on it dating back from one to forty  years: Dead Can Dance’s In Concert, essentially there 2012 #1 album, Anastasis done live, Steve Roach’s Rasa Dance, a collection with tracks dating back to the 1980s, and daftpunk-1367945965Tubular Beats, a remix of Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells.

And who would’ve thought that a band who had a #2 hit single, would be on an Echoes list? We didn’t play Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” but the album it came from Random Access Memories, came in at #9.  Top Ten on Echoes has to be better than #2 on Billboard, right?


BEST OF ECHOES 2013 LISTENER POLL

  1. Ludovico Einaudi In a Time Lapse (Ponderosa Music & Art) iTunes
  2. MobyInnocents (Mute) iTunes
  3. Dead Can DanceIn Concert (PIAS America)
  4. Sigur RosKveikur (XL Recordings) Kveikur - Sigur RÛs
  5. Ulrich SchnaussA Long Way to Fall (Domino Records)
  6. Agnes ObelAventine (Pias America)
  7. David BowieThe Next Day  (Columbia)
  8. Ólafur ArnaldsFor Now I Am Winter (Mercury Classics) iTunes
  9. Daft PunkRandom Access Memory (Columbia)
  10. Bombay Dub OrchestraTales from the Grand Bazaar (Six Degrees) iTunes
  11. David Helpling & Jon JenkinsFound (Spotted Peccary) iTunes
  12. Darshan AmbientLittle Things (Spotted Peccary) iTunes
  13. Anoushka ShankarTraces of You (Deutsche Grammophon) iTunes
  14. Steve Roach Rasa Dance: The Music of Connection (Projekt)
  15. ArboreaFortress of the Sun (ESP Disk Ltd.)
  16. Kitaro Final Call (Domo Records)
  17. Boards of CanadaTomorrow’s Harvest (Warp Records)
  18. Mike OldfieldTubular Beats (Eagle Rock Entertainment)
  19. R. Carlos Nakai & Will ClipmanAwakening the Fire (Canyon Records)
  20. Tom Griesgraber & Bert LamsUnnamed Lands (Inner Knot) iTunes
  21. Mazzy StarSeasons of Your Day (Ingrooves)
  22. The Civil WarsThe Civil Wars (Sensibility Recordings) iTunes
  23. Pat MethenyThe Orchestrion Project (Nonesuch) iTunes
  24. Bill FrisellBig Sur (Sony Masterworks)
  25. Pat MethenyTap: John Zorns’s Book of Angels, Vol. 20 (Nonesuch)

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

GIVE THE GIFT OF THE ECHOES CD OF THE MONTH CLUB

FoundNine of the CDs in this list were Echoes CDs of the Month, and the other three could’ve been on this list. Join the Echoes CD of the Month Club now and you can put David Helping and Jon Jenkins’ Found under somebodies Christmas tree.  It’s our December  CD of the Month.  You’ll get great CDs and help support Echoes at the same time.   You can do it all right here.

ORLRC19-250px


GIVE THEM THE GIFT OF TRANSMISSIONS:
THE ECHOES LIVING ROOM CONCERTS VOLUME 19

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album. Or Follow us on Twitter@echoesradio.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line. Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

From Beach Boys to Tangerine Dream: Ulrich Schnauss & Mark Peters in Echoes Podcast

October 11, 2013

Hear Ulrich Schnauss & Mark Peters Interview in the Echoes Podcast.

TomorrowIt’s been an Ulrich Schnauss year here at Echoes.  He had a CD of the Month in February this year with A Long Way to Fall and we interviewed him as well.  Then he played live for us in early September and now he’s back again.  It turned out that when he came in to play live he also had a forthcoming album with guitarist Mark Peters from Engineers, and it just so happened that Peters was tagging along with Schnauss on tour.  So I sat them down to talk about their music for an alternate reality.

Ulrich Schnauss is one of the icons of downtempo electronica with albums like A Strangely Isolated Place and A Long Way to Fall.  Mark Peters is a bit less well known in this country.  He has a band called Engineers in England who play a dreamy brand of shoegaze music.  He and Ulrich Schnauss hit it off so well that Schnauss actually joined Engineers.  But the two musicians have also released a pair of duet albums for guitar and electronics.  Their latest is Tomorrow is Another Day.

Ulrich Schnauss Live on Echoes

Ulrich Schnauss Live on Echoes

Highlights:
Mark Peters on The Beach Boys: It hit me really hard when I was kind of first learning to play guitar at 15.  And then I’d just become a super nut about it and every last bootleg, every little clip on YouTube, everything is just…and I think it’s just, you know, kind of a classical type complexity that’s just so interesting.
John Diliberto: You’re hardcore, aren’t you?
Mark Peters: Big time.  Bit of a geek.  Yeah, Ulrich’s got his head in his hands.

Ulrich Schnauss on altered states: That’s the point at the end of the day, like you’re trying to create something that doesn’t reflect the reality that surrounds you, but something that actually creates the opposite, a counterpoint to reality, an alternative or a utopia.

Hear Ulrich Schnauss and Mark Peters  on the Echoes Podcast.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

WorldsBeyondSign up for Echoes CD of the Month Club.   CD of the Month Club members will be getting Akara’s The World Beyond.  Follow the link to the Echoes CD of the Month Club and see what you’ve been missing.

Choose either a one time $1000 or on-going $84 Monthly PaymentSupport Echoes by becoming a member of the Echoes Sound Circle.

Think of the great artists you love on Echoes. Think of the informative interviews and exclusive live performances. Then, think of a world without Echoes. You can make sure that never happens by becoming a member of the Echoes Sound Circle.

Echoes is a non-profit 501(c3) organization just like your local public radio station. And all donations are tax deductible. You can support 130528_EchoesEchoes with a monthly donation that will barely disturb your credit card.

Join the Echoes Sound Circle and keep the soundscapes of Echoes flowing!

Ulrich Schnauss & Mark Peters on Echoes

October 8, 2013

Hear Ulrich Schnauss & Mark Peters Interview Tonight on Echoes.

TomorrowIt’s been an Ulrich Schnauss year here at Echoes.  He had a CD of the Month in February this year with A Long Way to Fall and we interviewed him as well.  Then he played live for us in early September and now he’s back again.  It turned out that when he came in to play live he also had a forthcoming album with guitarist Mark Peters from Engineers, and it just so happened that Peters was tagging along with Schnauss on tour.  So I sat them down to talk about their music for an alternate reality.

Ulrich Schnauss is one of the icons of downtempo electronica with albums like A Strangely Isolated Place and A Long Way to Fall.  Mark Peters is a bit less well known in this country.  He has a band called Engineers in England who play a dreamy brand of shoegaze music.  He and Ulrich Schnauss hit it off so well that Schnauss actually joined Engineers.  But the two musicians have also released a pair of duet albums for guitar and electronics.  Their latest is Tomorrow is Another Day.

Ulrich Schnauss Live on Echoes

Ulrich Schnauss Live on Echoes

Highlights:
Mark Peters on The Beach Boys: It hit me really hard when I was kind of first learning to play guitar at 15.  And then I’d just become a super nut about it and every last bootleg, every little clip on YouTube, everything is just…and I think it’s just, you know, kind of a classical type complexity that’s just so interesting.
John Dilibeto: You’re hardcore, aren’t you?
Mark Peters: Big time.  Bit of a geek.  Yeah, Ulrich’s got his head in his hands.

Ulrich Schnauss on altered states: That’s the point at the end of the day, like you’re trying to create something that doesn’t reflect the reality that surrounds you, but something that actually creates the opposite, a counterpoint to reality, an alternative or a utopia.

Hear Ulrich Schnauss and Mark Peters tonight on Echoes.

John Diliberto (((echoes)))

WorldsBeyondSign up for Echoes CD of the Month Club.   CD of the Month Club members will be getting Akara’s The World Beyond.  Follow the link to the Echoes CD of the Month Club and see what you’ve been missing.

Choose either a one time $1000 or on-going $84 Monthly PaymentSupport Echoes by becoming a member of the Echoes Sound Circle.

Think of the great artists you love on Echoes. Think of the informative interviews and exclusive live performances. Then, think of a world without Echoes. You can make sure that never happens by becoming a member of the Echoes Sound Circle.

Echoes is a non-profit 501(c3) organization just like your local public radio station. And all donations are tax deductible. You can support 130528_EchoesEchoes with a monthly donation that will barely disturb your credit card.

Join the Echoes Sound Circle and keep the soundscapes of Echoes flowing!

Best Echoes CDs of 2011.

December 12, 2011

The Best of Echoes 2011 Listener Poll

Here are the results from our Listener Poll for the Best of Echoes 2011.  Saturday and Sunday Echoes listeners get to hear the Best of Echoes  Echoes 12/17 & 18/2011.

Links below will take you to reviews of these albums with full track samples or to Amazon.

THE BEST OF ECHOES 2011 LISTENER POLL

1   Patrick O’HearnTransitions
2   David ArkenstoneAmbient World
3   Pat MethenyWhat’s It All About
4   Loreena McKennittThe Wind That Shakes the Barley
5   Agnes ObelPhilharmonics
6   MobyDestroyed
7   Jeff OsterSurrender
8   Daft PunkTron Legacy (OST)
9   Brian EnoDrums Between the Bells
10 Atomic SkunkAlchemy
11 RadioheadThe King of Limbs
12 Darshan AmbientDream in Blue
13 Peter GabrielNew Blood
14 Steve Roach and Erik WolloThe Road Eternal
15 Erik WolloSilent Currents
16 HammockAsleep in the Downlights
17 Paul EllisFrom Out of the Vast Comes Nearness
18 Kate BushDirector’s Cut
19 Al Di MeolaPursuit of Radical Rhapsody
20 Brendan PerryArk
21 WinterlightHope Dies Last
22 Tim PachecoOf Wordless Realms
23 Afro Celt Sound SystemCapture: 1995-2010
24 Keith MedleyRide
25 Azam AliFrom Night to the Edge of Day

You can see Echoes staff picks for 25 Essential Echoes CDs for 2011.

You can see my personal picks for the Top 10 Albums & Songs

Thanks to everyone who voted and congratulations to the lucky winners of  one year memberships to Echoes On-Line and the CD of theMonth Club and copies of Echo Location.

Special congratulations to the winning artists who provided us with great music for 2011.

You can get great CDs like  many of the albums on this list by becoming a member of the Echoes CD of the Month Club.

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news.

John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

Metheny Mécanique and Karaoke Koncerts

May 19, 2010

What’s the difference between a concert and Karaoke?

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The specter of plug ‘n’ play concerts has reared its pre-wired head again. I’ve been confronted with another spate of contrasting concerts.  On the one hand, there’s music that’s played live and in the moment and on the other, music that’s been packaged and frozen.   In the latter case, a live performance consists of defrosting the material while a lone musician solos  over the top.  This is especially hard for me to confront because most of that music is the stuff I love and have supported for over 35 years.

Pat Metheny & Orchestrion

Many electronic concerts have become little more than karaoke. A musician walks on stage, sits in front of one or two laptops, maybe a keyboard, hits start and spends most of the concert staring at a computer screen watching his composition slide by. Occasionally he might play some synth pads or even a solo line, but by and large, it’s all as fresh as a Swanson TV dinner.

Proponents of laptop performances will argue that with programs like Ableton Live, they can interact and change the music in real time. And I have seen this happen. Ulrich Schnauss gave a musically remarkable performance in the Echoes Living Room and at World Cafe Live a couple of years ago. His concert versions of music from Goodbye were radically different from the album. Yet even throughout this performance, I kept thinking, “Man, this would be so much more powerful if he had a couple of guitarists, keyboard player, bassist and drums.”  Canned music will never have the impact of a true live performance.    That was brought home by four  recent concerts.

Robert Rich @ Echoes

Both Spyra and Robert Rich recently played performances in Philadelphia including live Echoes sessions. I’ve been singing the praises of Robert Rich for a long time now. His album Ylang was an Echoes CD of the Month. But in concert, Rich is essentially doing a Music Minus One set, playing flutes and lap steel guitar over his elaborate, but completely pre-programmed backing tracks.

Spyra @ Echoes

At least Rich  brings along some real synthesizers that are triggered.  Wolfram Spyra pretty much left  his set to a couple of Mac computers and a couple of keyboards over which he noodled solos.    Bass lines pound, drums ricochet, chords lays down heavenly pathways and synthesizers shoot melodies off the rafters of St. Mary’s Church at The Gatherings,  but the only musician on stage stares mutely at a computer screen.

Artists like this make a pretense of live performance, but it’s barely a step above playing a CD on stage.   JJ, a band from Europe doesn’t even make that pretense.  On their CD, No. 3, they conjure up  a haunting brand of electronica with Elin Kastlander‘s smokey alto voice intoning echoes from the abyss.  In concert they sound just like their CD because the only thing live is Kastlander, who stood stoically still,  her thick blonde hair cascading over her shoulders, while she sang in front of their full backing tracks.  A couple of times, Joakim Benon, (I think), would come on stage, strum a guitar aimlessly and hug Kastlander before exiting. It was creepy, especially when the Enyaesque choirs of “Let Go” came forth, but there was only Eastlander, barely moving her lips.   There were times I thought she might be lip-syncing. When did alt-rock concerts become a Solid Gold performance? If you’re gonna do that, at least bring on the dancers.

I don’t know JJ’s story, but Sprya and Robert Rich argue that their music is too complex for one person to play live and that it’s not financially viable to bring a band.   I would argue that your live music should be scaled to what you’re capable of live.  If that means a solo set, then scale it to what you can actually play live without backing.    If you really need a band but you’re not committed enough to go to the expense or find like-minded players willing to suffer for your art, ,  then perhaps you shouldn’t be playing live concerts at all. Hundreds of rock groups scuffle through tiny clubs to make their art.   How is it different for these electronic acts?    A recording is one thing, a live performance is something else entirely.

Metheny's Orchestrion

Which brings me to Pat Metheny. He’s built his reputation on live performances presented in myriad permutations, the most popular being the Pat Metheny Group.    For this past year he’s been touring his Orchestrion concert. The Orchestrion is a mechanical orchestra with an exploded drum kit, pianos, vibes, marimba, glockenspiel, electric bass, robot guitars, bottle organs and more. Metheny can control much of this monster with his guitar, doubling lines on vibes and marimba, setting tempos on percussion and sometimes just playing piano with his guitar.  (Hear Metheny talk about the Orchestrion here.)

But the arrangements of the “Orchestrion Suite” are complex, as complex as the music on his previous Pat Metheny Group album, The Way Up and there is no way he can do that live no matter how fast he can trigger the Orchestrion instruments.    Instead, computers had the launch codes for much of the music.   What was a little deceptive was an improvisation the guitarist played to end the show before encores. He said it was a demonstration of how the system works. He played a guitar riff, looped it, played another riff and looped that in sync and started adding sounds from his orchestrion that were clearly triggered by his guitar.  The improvised work built up to a glorious climax with Metheny playing a classic guitar synth solo at the end.

The thing is, that’s not what he was doing during the rest of the concert. There was no live looping. The five compositions played from the Orchestrion album  were obviously pre-programmed arrangements and the only improvisation was in Metheny’s guitar solos. Those guitar solos were great and beyond the ken of most electronic musicians to match, but much of the rest was canned, albeit, in elaborate if not bizarre fashion with his stage-filling Orchestrion beast.

The lines of live vs pre-programmed are less clear with Pat Metheny.  The Orchestrion is a conceptual art project as much as a music performance.  He’s not trying to replicate a band.   It’s an amazing feat of technology and tenacity, and Metheny made it all appear effortless, but ultimately, there was something missing from the stage, which needed either 10 Pat Methenys or ten other musicians to effect his vision.

Jimmy Lavalle of Album Leaf @ Echoes

These concerts contrasted sharply with two other recent shows, The Album Leaf and Jonsi. Both shows were full of live musicians, and even though there was little improvisation, the performances were in the moment, energized by the mood on stage and the audiences.   The Jonsi show at the Electric Factory was transcendent, visually and musically.  The Sigur Ros singer/guitarist created a theatrical work that was  meticulously choreographed,  yet ragingly intense.    The Album Leaf gave a powerhouse show in the sweltering heat of the First Unitarian Church and came into the Echoes living room the next day, stripped down their live set-up to the basics, and still sounded amazing. Yes, they do use some glitch backing tracks, but by and large, it’s six musicians, in communion. It’s what happens when real musicians are playing live.

Music isn’t pure.  Technology pushes limits and especially with DJ and dance culture,  performance concepts that were taboo have fallen.  I don’t think there’s a line to be drawn, but I think I know when it’s been crossed.  So let me ask again:  What’s the difference between a concert and karaoke?

John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

Pat Metheny’s Mechanical Orchestra

January 19, 2010

Pat Metheny Goes Past Old School to Antique School.

Hear the audio version of this interview with music in the Echoes Podcast.

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Pat Metheny with the Orchestrio

 

You can hear the full interview with Pat Metheny with Orchestrion demo and Metheny’s music here.

As a child, I remember  visiting Clark’s Trading Post in New Hampshire and being transfixed by an instrument that looked a like a player piano except it had a glass pane and inside were drums and cymbals that played as if inhabited by phantom spirits.  That was an Orchestrion, a mechanical orchestra that flourished in the 19th and early 20th century.  In mid-December, I went to a decommissioned church in Brooklyn where a giant, modern day version of that instrument stretched about 25 feet long and 12 feet high with drums, robot guitars, jug organs, marimba, vibes, piano and more. Standing in the middle is guitarist Pat Metheny.

Orchestion ProjectIn a mix of the antique concepts and computer technology, Metheny has designed his own Orchestrion.  As he picks his guitar he’s joined by this phantom ensemble of live instruments, but no musicians.  Pat Metheny says it’s something he’s wanted to do since he was a child and operated his grandfather’s player piano.  Originally the Orchestrion was a player piano turned into an ensemble.  Metheny saw his first one near his childhood home in Missouri

Pat Metheny: There was a pizza parlor in Kansas City that had one, and I remember saying, “Wow, a bass drum and a cymbal!”  And I remember thinking even then, like, well, why couldn’t it go some hip cymbal patterns?  Why does it just have to go “Chhhh.”

On his album, Orchestrion, Pat Metheny makes it do more than that.  While the original orchestrions were clunky and mechanical, Pat Metheny’s sound like…. the Pat Metheny Group. David Oakes is Metheny’s longtime technical engineer.

David Oakes: I was outside the room, and I heard music playing, and I knew it was Pat, but I couldn’t think of what record it was from.  So I walk in to hear what record it is, and it’s all the instruments playing.  It actually sounded like real people all of a sudden.

Pat Metheny insists he isn’t out to replace his band, but it is the band inside his head.

Pat Metheny: This is sort of like a look into my brain in a way, because every little thing about it is my thing, and there you go.  That’s the way it is.

You can hear Pat Metheny’s Orchestrion to full effect on his new album, Orchestrion Project on Nonesuch Records.

To hear the full Echoes  interview with Pat Metheny with music and demo for the Orchestrion, go here.

~John Diliberto ((( echoes )))

Portions of this article originally appeared in Jazziz Magazine in 1992 and on Echoes 1992

Echoes On LineSiUlrich Schnauss - A Long Way to Fallgn up for Echoes CD of the Month Club.  With the Echoes CD of the Month Club, you get great CDs like A Long Way to Fall.  Club members will get this album 10 days before release.  Follow the link to the Echoes CD of the Month Club  and see what you’ve been missing.

Now you can go Mobile with Echoes On-Line.  Find out how you can listen to Echoes 24/7 wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad or Droid.

Join us on Facebook where you’ll get all the Echoes news so you won’t be left behind when Dead Can Dance appear on the show, Tangerine Dream tours or Brian Eno drops a new iPad album.

 


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